The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway // 52 Books, 52 Weeks
“He always thought of the sea as la mar which is what people call her in Spanish when they love her. Sometimes those who lover her say bad things of her but they are always said as though she were a woman. Some of the younger fishermen, those who used buoys as floats for their lines and had motorbikes, bought when the shark livers had brought much money, spoke of her as el mar which is masculine. They spoke of her as a contestant or a place or even an enemy. But the old man always thought of her as feminine and as something that gave or withheld great favours, and if she did wild or wicked things it was because she could not help them.”
I know a few people who would roll their eyes at this book, but in return I can only offer my own eyes rolling in their direction. With Santiago’s wisdom (“First you borrow. Then you beg.”) and his luckless endeavors, there is a sense that every action and every sentence is something much more powerful than what we can imagine. Much like the old man himself, the book is rather unassuming until you dig into the blood and guts of it, like a shark to prey. 

The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway // 52 Books, 52 Weeks

He always thought of the sea as la mar which is what people call her in Spanish when they love her. Sometimes those who lover her say bad things of her but they are always said as though she were a woman. Some of the younger fishermen, those who used buoys as floats for their lines and had motorbikes, bought when the shark livers had brought much money, spoke of her as el mar which is masculine. They spoke of her as a contestant or a place or even an enemy. But the old man always thought of her as feminine and as something that gave or withheld great favours, and if she did wild or wicked things it was because she could not help them.

I know a few people who would roll their eyes at this book, but in return I can only offer my own eyes rolling in their direction. With Santiago’s wisdom (“First you borrow. Then you beg.”) and his luckless endeavors, there is a sense that every action and every sentence is something much more powerful than what we can imagine. Much like the old man himself, the book is rather unassuming until you dig into the blood and guts of it, like a shark to prey. 

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